The REAL economics of fantasy

The REAL economics of fantasy

Just a short post as I’ve been occupied today with discussing the economic situation with a few executives in key industries. It’s a bit of a good news/bad news situation… which do you want first?

Very well, the bad news is that the global economy is looking in atrocious shape indeed. By which I mean that the financial crisis that was theoretically contained last fall by the various fiscal and monetary authorities appears to have finally spread into the material economy; I’m not talking about the April OECD outlook or anything that you see on the news but rather the sort of thing that’s going to be showing up in reports three months from now.

The good news, on the other hand, is that this sort of situation tends to boost books and games. When people stay home, they usually read a lot more and there are very few entertainments with a less expensive cost per hour than games. It’s probably not an accident that Robert E. Howard’s works were born during the Great Depression or that Tolkein wrote The Lord of the Rings during World War II, writers seek escapism for much the same reason readers do. Since those magazines that survive hard times tend to thrive both creatively and commercially, based on John’s previous comments we can predict that Black Gate will not only continue to improve, but may well become the foremost magazine of fantasy literature.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x