Search Results for: Galileo

Galileo Magazine of Science & Fiction, November 1979: A Retro-Review

Cover art by Larry Blamire – “Louis Wu Making Good His Escape” I’m going to start my review of the November 1979 issue of Galileo magazine by talking about Omni. I’ve heard people, people of a certain age — people who were there, man — talk about Omni like it was the second coming of Christ. I bring that up because Galileo magazine was like Christ rolled the stone out of the way and was serving up fancy drinks in the tomb….

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Finding Galileo in Florence

Galileo’s tomb in Santa Croce, Florence Florence was the birthplace of the Italian Renaissance and home to countless great names in art, literature, and science. For me, though, one figure towers over them all–Galileo Galilei. He was a man who profoundly changed how we look at the universe, a true genius whose impact is still felt today. So I and my astronomer wife went searching for him in Florence. Call it a pilgrimage if you want. It certainly felt that…

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Amazing Stories, November 1989: A Retro Review

  Amazing Stories, November 1989. Cover by Janet Aulisio An unexpected issue came up during my reading of the November, 1989 Amazing Stories. In 1979 I was 10 years old, and I barely remember being 10 years old. In 1989 I was 20, and I remember being 20; maybe not 100%, but I remember enough. In fact, I remember enough to know what 20-year-old me (20YOM) would think of the stories in the November, 1989 cadre. Sometimes, 20YOM’s views conflicts…

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Jump Back! Quatro-Decadal Review, Looking Ahead to November 1989

The Holy Trinity With the 1969 and 1979 magazines behind me I prepare to delve into 1989.  A problem with the decadal review is that, well, it comes in decade intervals. I was 10 years old in 1979, but in 1989 I was a well-seasoned 20.  The answers?  I had them.   In the intervening decade I had gotten a car, a job, started taekwondo, finished high school, and was deep into college. Unlike 10-year-old me, 20-year-old me had a full…

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A Decadal Review of Science Fiction from 1979: Wrap-up

For the second round of the quatro-decadal review, I read and reviewed six periodicals from November 1979, in the following order: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction Galileo Magazine of Science & FictionAnalog Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Amazing StoriesOmni I would put Analog at the top of the list, solid stories — especially Mark McGarry’s “Phoenix,” Clifford D. Simak’s The Visitors installment (a ‘part two’ that stands on its own) and Kevin O’Donnell Jr’s “Old Friends” — interesting science…

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Omni Magazine, November 1979: A Retro-Review

Worst Cover Ever I will admit that I was very nervous about delving into Omni Magazine. For years, decades! I’ve heard people talk about Omni in breathless tones of awe! Yet I knew very little about it. Not to say that it was entirely unknown to me; I have distinct memories, back in like 1983, of being at the doctor’s office and they had several issues of Omni in the waiting room. I even flipped through some of them. Here…

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James Nicoll on Amazons! edited by Jessica Amanda Salmonson

Amazons! (DAW, 1979). Cover by Michael Whelan Every once in a while I get asked to recommend other sites out there for readers who enjoy Black Gate. There are some top-notch book blogs, of course — like Rich Horton’s excellent Strange at Ecbatan, and Mark R. Kelly’s overlooked Views from Crestmont Drive — and the usual publisher sites, like Tor.com and Locus Online. But recently I’ve been spending a lot of time at James Nicoll Reviews, partly because of the wide range of…

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We Have Launch: Arthur C. Clarke’s Prelude to Space

Prelude to Space by Arthur C. Clarke; First Edition: World Editions, Inc. (Galaxy Science Fiction Novel #3), 1951 Cover art by Bunch (click to enlarge) Prelude to Space by Arthur C. Clarke World Editions, Inc. (Galaxy Science Fiction Novel #3) (160 pages, $0.25 in magazine digest format, 1951) Having in my two previous columns here covered Isaac Asimov’s first proper novel (Pebble in the Sky) and Robert A. Heinlein’s first-written novel (For Us, the Living), it’s appropriate now to revisit…

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When Six Americans Defeat an Invading Army: Robert A. Heinlein’s Sixth Column

Sixth Column by Robert A. Heinlein. First Edition: Gnome Press, 1949. Cover by Edd Cartier Sixth Column by Robert A. Heinlein (Gnome Press, 1949, 256 pages, $2.50 in hardcover; serialized earlier in Astounding Science Fiction, January-March 1941) Sixth Column was the earliest novel-length work by Robert A. Heinlein, though it was serialized in Astounding magazine (Jan, Feb, and March 1941, under the pseudonym Anson MacDonald) and not published in book form until 1949, by which time three or four other…

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Amazing Stories, November 1979: A Retro-Review

Cover by Elinor Mavor Coming in after Asimov’s, Amazing Stories is a svelte 130 pages. One thing that really stood out to me in this issue was that almost everyone in it was a novice writer — many of the stories were first sales. It isn’t the ‘theme’ of the magazine, or of this issue or anything, but it is a thing I noticed. There is something refreshing about a quality amateur story, a certain unpolished plunging-ahead that can sweep…

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